Stanley Bridge Centre connecting to CBC

Looking to stay on top of local, national and international stories? Then you’ve come to the right spot.
In addition to our coverage of events in the Stanley Bridge area and our twenty news feeds from major international publications, we are also offering CBC Prince Edward Island stories every day. We would welcome any feedback from our readers.
Have any comments on stories you’ve seen on the Stanley Bridge Centre’s website or have suggestions or submissions? Send your email to peijim@hotmail.com.



Feature Story


 
‘This is the face of the health-care crisis’: Woman fighting cancer issues plea to Nova Scotia premier. Click on the link for the CBC story. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/health-care-plea-video-1.5110684?cmp=rss


More from CBC.ca

  • Populism can be positive and constructive, even when fueled by anger, says Preston Manning. Click on the link for the CBC Radio story. http://www.cbc.ca/1.5110326



 


Share

80-year-old twins pull six trout from the Stanley River

Photos and story by Jim Brown

Not everyone was complaining about a bad start to the trout season. One day after the April 15 opening twin brothers from Ontario who grew up on PEI, Ron and Don Rayner, landed six large brook trout in Stanley Bridge. The 80-year-old anglers caught them at the bridge on the Rattenbury Road.

The two had been fishing since 6:30 am, using gudgeon as bait, and were still fishing at 3 pm when these photos were taken.

The brothers were joined by several other anglers who fished through a mix of rain, snow and heavy winds.

Share

Hundreds of jobs up for grabs at North Shore Job Fair

Story and photos by Jim Brown
Jobs, jobs, jobs and more jobs. That was the theme of the 2019 TIAPEI North Shore Job Fair, held April 13 at the Stanley Bridge Country Resort.
A total of 495 jobs were available at 27 businesses, with Cavendish-based Maritime Fun Group alone hoping to fill 300 positions for the busy summer season. Needless to say anyone armed with a resume and a ready smile had a good shot at landing one.

Share

Stanley Bridge Centre renovations underway

Say goodbye to the porta-potty!

More than $80,000 worth of renovations are underway at the Stanley Bridge Centre, including two new washrooms, work on the front entrance, sewer and water connections and a new kitchen. Repairs to the roof are also planned. Adam Perry (in photo), owner of Big Dogs Construction in Freetown, along with his crew, began work on the site April 3. The renos should be done by the start of the farmer’s market season. The Stanley Bridge Memorial Society, the building’s operator, is in the midst of a major fundraising effort to help pay for the renos. Anyone who wants to contribute can contact Jim Brown at peijim@hotmail.com.


Photos by Jim Brown

Share

Fundraiser brings in more than $23,000 for Fyfe family

By Jim Brown

Janet Cotton, one of several volunteers involved in a fundraiser at the New London Community Complex for the Fyfe family of Stanley Bridge, was thrilled at the turnout and money raised.

“I think it was a really fantastic evening,” said Janet, of the more than $23,000 raised during the March 22 benefit.

“I’d say it exceeded expectations,” she said, estimating the number of people who attended the event at more than 300.

The $23,000 haul includes money donated to an account at the Malpeque Bay Credit Union, which is still accepting donations.

A total of 185 items were auctioned off during the evening.

An earlier Gofundme campaign raised $14,385, which was substantially more than the $10,000 target.

Alfred and Karen Fyfe, and their daughter Michelle and her fiance Kristen Rochford, were living in the nearly two century old building when it caught fire on Feb 20, and burned to the ground.

They were fortunate to escape, along with the family’s dog and a cat, but they lost nearly all of their possessions.

The historic farmhouse had been in the Fyfe family for six generations.

Donations are still being accepted, and in addition to the Malpeque Bay Credit Union, would be donors can also contact Janet Cotton at 886-2528, Bethany Cousins, 439-6723, Sandra Blackett at 886-3239 and 303-3164, Stephanie Moase, 886-2599, Nancy Sanderson, 621-1958 and Angie Matheson at 626-9902.

Share

Groundhog Day in Ottawa

Justice committee could take a while to get to bottom of SNC-Lavalin scandal
Story and photos by Jim Brown

It’s Day 334 of the House of Commons Justice Committee’s hearing into the SNC-Lavalin affair.

There’s been a federal election since the committee started its work in February, of 2019 and the Liberal majority has been reduced to a thin minority, propped up by the Green Party’s 35 seats.

On this day yet another high-level bureaucrat has demanded an appearance before the committee. An earlier witness said he observed the bureaucrat putting milk in his coffee, to which the indignant bureaucrat responded: “It’s a bald-faced lie! Everyone knows I’m lactose intolerant!”

Day 335

RCMP officials are invited to present details on the progress of their investigation into the PMO and Justin Trudeau. Trudeau was visiting PEI during the hearing and was spotted on a lobster fishing boat hauling a trap. His little finger was crushed in a three pound lobster’s claw.

Day 378 The very same day SNC-Lavalin closes its doors for good a legislative aide tells the committee he overhead Chrystia Freeland say the Tim’s donuts served at a Liberal party fundraiser were stale. Heated debate ensues.

Day 382 Three school buses disgorge more than 100 students at the hearing. They were there as part of a class project on civics. One was overhead telling a teacher, “This blows big chunks.”

Day 392

A White House staffer was in the visitor’s gallery. The staffer was on a fact-finding mission to Ottawa and was due to report back to the GOP conference the next day. “I don’t get it,” said the aide. “Where’s the million dollar payoff? Was anyone even groped?”

Date 398 Green Party Leader Elizabeth May testifies. She apologizes for not preparing for her appearance, having believed it was an emergency meeting on safety measures to protect the North Atlantic right whale.

Day 412 Justice committee members vote to take the show on the road, scheduling sessions for Thunder Bay, O’Leary, PEI, a legion in Calgary and the Hooters in Ottawa.

Day 433 Justice committee discovers it has blown through its budget. No more Tims.

Day 455 The backlog of witnesses wanting to speak at the hearings has reached several hundred. Here’s how a frustrated committee member described the situation: “Someone says something that’s at odds with an earlier witness so a nose is going to get out of joint. So he or she is going to want to rebut the witness’s testimony, and then someone else will feel wronged in the process. Or maybe Andrew Scheer thinks something is still being covered up so the committee will call more witnesses and the cycle will continue like one of those Groundhog Day loops.”

The committee member says this will continue until everyone is exhausted or there’s another election. “It’s the Canadian way and a lot cheaper than throwing people in jail.”

Day 456 “I can’t take it anymore! Make it stop,” is the anguished cry from an unnamed committee member, that somehow gets on CBC Radio.

Day 457 Andrew Scheer says the government is determined to cover up one of Canada’s biggest political scandals. He wants the witness list expanded.

Several members phone in sick and the justice committee adjourns for an indefinite period.

Share


 

Times of India News Feed – India

MSNBC News Feed – Latest News

The Jerusalem Post – Front Page

Share

Black History Month

Viola Desmond

 
Black History on Prince Edward Island
By Dale Amundson, Editor, SeniorsPEI.ca, February 2, 2019

Again this year there is a paucity of events related to Black History Month. A few related events at public libraries – one at each of 5 libraries and a second event at the Confederation Centre Public Library. The only listing related to Black History Month on the PEI Government website is of these events. Even the Black Cultural Society of PEI facebook page has nothing more to offer.

One wonders if there is a belief that there is no black history on Prince Edward Island. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Not only is there a black history, there is also a history of slaves and slave ownership. Some of Prince Edward Island’s most prominent residents were slave owners.

Under French rule, it was legal to own slaves on Île St.-Jean. However, the first record of enslaved Africans was in 1784 when 16 “negro servants” arrived with the Loyalists; by 1785 there were almost 100. After 1799, when the name was changed to Prince Edward Island, there were enslaved Africans in Charlottetown and Summerside. In PEI, perhaps due to the small number, enslaved Africans were allowed to be baptized and to marry legally. The wealthy owned enslaved Africans, including businessman William Shurman and the Lieutenant-Governor Edmund Fanning.

Many people are not aware that there were black people on Prince Edward Island in the 19th century, but there were. A black community known as The Bog, developed around Euston and Rochford streets in Charlottetown, near Government Pond, in the 1800s.

Most of the descendants of these black Islanders have been assimilated into the population and are no longer a visible minority. There are black people in thousands of families, from one end of the Island to the other.

In 2014, as part of the celebration marking the 150 anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference, a stage production called Tales from the Old Stock: Stories and Songs of P.E.I Black History was performed at the 2014 Celebration Zone. It chronicled some of the missing pieces of Island history through skits and storytelling, as reported in the Guardian at the time.

Historian Bruce Ziff maintains that the first “abolitionist statute” in the Empire was Prince Edward Island’s 1781 act regulating slavery. The only statute in the post-revolutionary, second British Empire to regulate slaves explicitly. A detailed academic analysis of slavery on Prince Edward Island in the article Slave Life and Slave Law in Colonial Prince Edward Island, 1769-1825 by Harvey Amani Whitfield provides some compelling information, along with detailed footnotes and a bibliography. A list of known slave names or identities exists in the appendix of the article.

The 1781 act regulating slavery was abolished in 1825 by an act of the Legislature. By that time there were no slaves remaining on the island.

Those of us who care that the history of Prince Edward Island is represented honestly and inclusively look forward to the time when the Government is willing to commit resources sufficient to bring awareness of the meaning and importance of Black History Month, and black history generally to everyone on the Island.

Share