Black History Month celebrated at Kensington library with drums and traditional dance

Story and photos by Jim Brown

Mufaro Chakabuda, left with Kat Carroll during a drumming session.

Mufaro Chakabuda, who was born and grew up in Zimbabwe, was a special guest at the Kensington Heritage Library on Feb 23, during Black History Month on PEI. She gave a compelling presentation on her native country and the 54 nations that make up the continent of Africa.

The presentation also featured traditional drumming and dancing, with everyone getting to their feet to join her in ceremonial dances.
She said Africa’s largest nation by population is Nigeria, with 150 million people.

Mufaro went on to say Ethiopian Airlines is the largest airline in Africa and is bigger than Air Canada and British Airways.
There are literally thousands of different tribes in Africa, with each tribe having its own language and culture.

In many ways African nations are ahead of the developed world. There is much more to Africa than the grim stories that routinely make news headlines.
Rwanda, for instance, leads every other nation on earth in an important environmental initiative.

“They are the first country in the world to introduce a no-plastic policy,” she said.

Anyone with plastic items in their possession, even a toothbrush, can be charged with a criminal offence.

Mufaro, who arrived in Canada at the age of 19 to study at Dalhousie University, went on to found the Maritime Centre for African Dance with just $20. She also founded a publishing house and a charity for scholarships directed towards Zimbabweans.

Mufaro Chakabuda shares a lighter moment with Kensington youngster Zoe Carroll.

Zoe Carroll, after a miscue or two quickly picked up the beat of Mufaro’s drumming.

She has won numerous national and regional awards for her entrepreneurial accomplishments and her community leadership.
Mufaro divides her time between her work in Canada and her native Zimbabwe.

She said she hoped her presentation, in addition to entertaining people, would leave everyone with a “realistic picture of the continent.”

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